Best PC Cases 2023: Our Tested Picks for Your Next Build

Fractal Design North
(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

PC builders often overlook the importance of the PC case when choosing parts for a new system. Or they push the case decision off until the very end of the component-choosing process. But you should consider your case options early.

The best PC case for your build will decide the size, shape, and identity of your computer, dictating its looks and what fits inside. Plus the case is a major factor when it comes to the noise levels your system will generate under load thanks to its fans, and it massively impacts the cooling potential of your rig.

You can choose to go for one of the best Mini-ITX cases to minimize your system’s footprint on your desk, or you can get a chassis like Be Quiet's Dark Base Pro 901 to house a big, butt-kicking workstation with acres of expansion possibilities. Below, we’ve gathered a list of the best PC cases we've tested, from the dozens of models to land on our test bench in recent years. As long as you check whether the parts you want to use will fit and you like the looks, one of these cases should keep you and your PC parts happy for several years to come.

Best PC Cases

The Best PC Cases You Can Buy Today

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Best-Looking PC Case

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Best-Looking PC Case

Specifications

Type: Mid Tower
Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX
Card Length Supported: 356mm (14 inches)
Storage Support: (2) 3.5 inches, (6) 2.5 inches
Included Fans: (2) 140mm PWM

Reasons to buy

+
Exceptional thermal performance
+
Gorgeous Solid drive support
+
PWM fans
+
Side fan bracket included
+
Nice price

Reasons to avoid

-
Noisy

We aren't sure who asked for a PC case that mixed mid-century modern design (wooden slats and all) and high airflow, but we sure are glad that Fractal Design answered with the excellent North mid-tower. Available with either a mesh side (as we tested) or tempered glass, and in white with chrome accents on the IO and feet, or black with some seriously pretty brass, this is arguably the prettiest PC case ever produced, period.

And thanks to its pair of 140mm fans and an included side bracket (for the mesh model) that can hold another pair of 140mm fans (not included), the North has excellent thermals as well. Just note that it can get noisy when delivering those temps. The glass side panel may help a bit on the noise front, but likely at the cost of at least some thermal performance.

If you don't like the case's looks, then the company's Meshify 2 Compact (below), is probably a better option for you. But if you're after a case that matches the pretty furniture in your living room, has lots of room for storage, and won't break the bank at $130, nothing else comes close to the North. We hope Fractal's bold move inspires other case makers to try something different.

Read: Fractal Design North Review 

Best Budget ATX Gaming Case

Phanteks Eclipse G360A (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Best Budget ATX Gaming Case

Specifications

Type: Mid Tower
Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX
Card Length Supported: 400mm (15.7 inches)
Storage Support: (2) 3.5 inches (2) 2.5 inches Included
Included Fans: (3) 120mm ARGB

Reasons to buy

+
Great price for what you get
+
Three included aRGB PWM fans
+
Impressive thermal performance

Reasons to avoid

-
Poor cable routing design
-
No USB-C
-
No real front intake filter

Phanteks has a history of delivering value and performance with its cases, and the Eclipse G360A is no exception. At $100, it costs about $10 more than the current price of the previous Eclipse P360A, but you get an extra RGB fan and support for larger 360 radiators at the top and front. And with the new G360A, all three fans feature PWM for better efficiency, noise output and control. If that isn’t worth an extra $10 to you, then you may want to scoop up the P360A while it’s still available.

Despite some quirks in its design, the Eclipse G360A is a truly great case for gamers on a budget. Heck, even if money isn’t a major issue, it’s still nice to get good airflow and attractive RGB without spending a lot. Sure you could pay more for something else, but the Eclipse G360A is proof that you don’t have to spend a lot of money to get a great breezy box for your PC parts.

Read: Phanteks Eclipse G360A Review 

Best Budget ATX Gaming Case Alternative

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Best Budget ATX Gaming Case (Alternative)

Specifications

Type: Mid Tower
Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX
Card Length Supported: 391mm (15.4 inches)
Storage Support: (2) 3.5 inches or (6) 2.5 inches
Included Fans: (2) 160mm RGB, (1) 140mm

Reasons to buy

+
Two RGB 160mm fans
+
Dedicated PCIe /GPU fan bracket
+
Excellent cable management
+
Bridged IO connector

Reasons to avoid

-
RGB controller and PCIe fan sold separately 

With a starting price of just $100 (or $15 more if you want to add an RGB controller and more USB ports), Lian Li' Lancool 216 delivers some of the excellent design features of its pricier O11D Evo and Lancool III cases, while adding a nifty PCIe fan mount, and large 160mm RGB intake fans. The top IO can be moved to the left side, near the bottom, if you're going to keep the case on your desk.

The LanCool 216 isn't a quiet case, but its thermal performance is excellent – especially if you add a rear 120mm below the GPU mounts, via the included bracket. There are hundreds of cases around the $100 price point, but the 216 stands out thanks to novel features for its price, great airflow, and solid design, with superb cable routing. We just wish an extra fan for the PCIe bracket were included in the price.

Read: Lian Li Lancool 216 Review

Best Premium RGB ATX Gaming Case

Corsair 4000X (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Best Premium RGB ATX Gaming Case

Specifications

Type: Mid Tower
Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX
Card Length Supported: 360mm (14.2 inches)
Storage Support: (2) 3.5” (2) 2.5”
Included Fans: (3) 120mm ARGB

Reasons to buy

+
Clean aesthetics and refined interior
+
Good enough thermal performance
+
Mesh option (without RGB) for performance enthusiasts or budget builders
+
RGB variant includes iCUE hub
+
Relatively quiet

Reasons to avoid

-
Only one front USB-A port
-
Fans don’t spin fast enough for extreme performance requirements

Corsair’s 4000X RGB is a sleek gaming tower that comes with two glass panels and three RGB spinners. Priced at about $135 now, it’s not cheap, but its design is thoroughly considered and as you build with it, it’s clear where Corsair’s gaming and PC building pedigree comes from. Indeed, the 4000X RGB (as well as the similar 4000D airflow), is an extremely easy and convenient chassis to build a system in, and everything just makes sense. 

While it won’t blow you away with premium materials such as aluminum, the dark tinted glass ensures that you only see RGB lighting inside the case, allowing you to be a little sloppy with cable management because you won’t see it anyway. Add to that Corsair’s class-leading RGB ecosystem, and you’ve got a very pretty case that’s convenient in use and always looks good, no matter what you install inside it.

Read: Corsair Obsidian Series 4000X RGB Review 

Alternatively, if you're after something with a bit more flexibility, the Lian Li Lancool III RBG is an impressive option with movable front IO, excellent cable management and lots of internal space. But priced about $30 more than the Corsair case, with somewhat noisy fans and CPU thermals that weren't quite as good as we'd expect from a mesh front case with three 140mm spinners, it's not as easy to recommend as Corsair's 4000X RGB.

Best Mainstream Airflow-Focused Case

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Best Mainstream Airflow-Focused Case

Specifications

Type: Mid-Tower
Motherboard Support: E-ATX, ATX, Micro ATX, Mini ITX
Card Length Supported: 15.74 inches (39.98 cm)
Storage Support: (2) 3.5 or (4) 2.5-inch
Included Fans: (2) 120 mm

Reasons to buy

+
Surprisingly quiet
+
Impressive and quiet stock case fans
+
Satisfying cable management

Reasons to avoid

-
No RGB (a Pro for some) 

With just two of the company's F120Q Airflow case fans behind a skeletal frame with a perforated front panel, the NZXT H7 Flow manages to deliver excellent temperature and noise level numbers in our testing, beating or competing well against pricier chassis with more fans and glass panels. It's also a pleasure to build in, with good cable management and a $130 MSRP that's quite reasonable in this era of seemingly ever-increasing prices.

The primary missing feature here, which will feel refreshing for many builders, is the lack of any RGB to light up your system. That, combined with the boxy look and perforated front means this case isn't the prettiest on our list, but it can certainly look good with some tasteful lighting delivered via your components, extra fans or a light strip. And if you don't like the look of the fully vented front and you aren't that concerned about keeping your temps a low as they can go, the non-Flow H7 model has a solid front, but with everything else we loved about the H7 Flow.

Read: NZXT H7 Flow review 

Best Performance-Focused ATX Case

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Best Performance-Focused ATX Case

Specifications

Type: ATX Mid-Tower
Motherboard Support: E-ATX, ATX, Micro ATX, Mini-ITX
Card Length Supported: 16.9 inches (42.93 cm)
Storage Support: (2) 3.5 or (4) 2.5-inch
Included Fans: (4) 140 mm RGB

Reasons to buy

+
Lots of features for the price
+
Respectable IO
+
Four included RGB Light Wings fans
+
Rotatable PCIe bracket
+
Sound-dampening foam

Reasons to avoid

-
Visual design looks a bit plain
-
PCIe riser cable not included

Be Quiet’s Shadow Base 800 FX case may not turn heads based on its looks alone, but it’s one of the best-performing thermal and acoustic cases we have tested. At $220, it’s far from the most affordable, especially for a mid-tower. But its stellar performance and inclusion of four aRGB fans make it worth the investment.

If you don’t care about lighting, the company also offers a non-FX model that drops the included fan count down from four to three, and sells for $170. Neither model is near the affordable end of the mid-tower case spectrum. But as we saw in our testing, both the thermal and acoustic performance of the Shadow Base 800 FX are up there with the best PC cases we’ve tested.

Read: be quiet! Shadow Base 800 FX Review

Best Compact ATX Case

Lian Li O11 Air Mini (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Best Compact ATX Case

Specifications

Type: ATX Case
Motherboard Support: ATX
Card Length Supported: 362mm (14.6 inches)
Storage Support: (4) 3.5” (2) 2.5”
Included Fans: 2x 140mm PWM, 1x 120mm PWM

Reasons to buy

+
Improved cooling and 3 PWM fans
+
Supports ATX boards and PSUs
+
Affordable at $110

Reasons to avoid

-
 Ditches aluminum panels for steel
-
No longer as ITX-focused
-
Ugly bottom air filter implementation remains

Lian Li’s PC-O11 Dynamic has been a staple, go-to PC case for pretty builds in recent years, but its days might be numbered. The O11D Mini was inspired by its design, but had a few issues. But now, the O11 Air Mini comes in as a brilliant alternative. 

Priced at just $110, you get a lot for your money with this case, including three PWM fans, bits of pretty aluminum, a glass panel, handsome looks, plentiful IO, a brilliant internal design and full ATX compatibility. 

The chassis features an unusual side-by-side chambered design, but building in it is a breeze and its performance is well up to snuff by modern standards. With this many features, great handsome styling, and such value for money, it’s a case that easily earns its place on this list. 

Read: Lian Li O11 Air Mini Review 

Best Design-Focused Mini-ITX Case

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

8. Fractal Design Terra

Best Design-Focused Mini-ITX Case

Specifications

Type: SFF
Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX
Card Length Supported: 322.1mm (12.68 inches)
Storage Support: (2) 2.5-inch
Included Fans: None

Reasons to buy

+
Stunning wood-accented looks
+
Extremely compact
+
Flexible spine to adjust cooling or GPU space

Reasons to avoid

-
No front audio jacks
-
Cramped cooling, storage and PSU support

The smallest DIY PC cases from just a few years ago have often been thwarted by the increased cooling needs and size of today's components – particularly graphics cards like Nvidia's RTX 4090. But at 10.4 liters, the Mini-ITX Fractal Design Terra case has (just) enough room for most big GPUs, while delivering eye-catching aesthetics thanks to an aluminum exterior with some real wood trip up front. As compact cases go, this is one of the prettiest around.
I doubt it will have as wide an appeal as its larger North cousin, since component and airflow options are far more limiting here. But if you don't need to pack in the absolute most powerful components (particularly on the CPU side) and you don't need more than a few storage drives, Fractal has once again delivered one of the prettiest cases available – especially if you want a respite from the RGB and aggressive designs that dominate the gaming side of the PC realm. And the Terra's flip-up doors and adjustable spine make this case surprisingly easy to build in for something so compact. Just make sure you bring your modular SFX power supply.

Read: Fractal Design Terra Hands On 

Best High-End XL/EATX Case

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Best High-End XL/EATX Case

Specifications

Type: Full Tower
Motherboard Support: E-ATX, ATX, Micro ATX, Mini ITX
Card Length Supported: 490mm (19.29 inches)
Storage Support: (12) 3.5 or 2.5-inch
Included Fans: (2) 200 mm, (3) 120 mm

Reasons to buy

+
Great thermal performance
+
Gorgeous glass grille and infinity mirror
+
Iris LCD screen + Server-level drive support
+
Tool-free GPU, PSU and drive installation

Reasons to avoid

-
Very expensive
-
Side panels aren’t hinged

Cooler Master's HAF 700 Evo packs in loads of unique features, like an edge-lit RGB glass grille front with a circular LCD display, an infinity mirror to hide ugly bits of the interior while showing off your pretty components and five front USB ports. There's also room for up to 12 drives and EATX server-class motherboards, plus clearance for the largest graphics cards and coolers. 

But Cooler Master didn't forget about performance with its HAF 700 Evo. It lands at or near the top of our testing charts, thanks to two huge 200 mm intake fans and a trio of smaller 120 mm spinners. Plus, with 18 fan mounts, airflow can get even better. 

The only downsides of the HAF 700 Evo are its $500-plus price, the fact that it weighs over 50 pounds empty, and the dust filter is behind the front panel, which is difficult to remove. If you're after great looks and great performance with loads of room for high-end parts, Cooler Master's flagship HAF is hard to beat.

Read: Cooler Master HAF 700 Evo review 

Best Case for High-End Rigs and Workstations

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Best Case for High-End Rigs and Workstations

Specifications

Type: Mid-Tower ATX
Motherboard Support: Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX, E-ATX (285 mm)
Card Length Supported: 467mm (18.4 inches)
Storage Support: (11) 3.5" (6 brackets included), (4) 2.5" (2 brackets included)
Included Fans: (3) 140mm

Reasons to buy

+
Interior brilliance
+
Excellent cooling performance
+
Easy panel and dust filter removal

Reasons to avoid

-
Overkill for modest builds
-
Slightly buzzy fan motors

Fractal offers a thoughtful, versatile design aimed at ease-of-use, and delivers a very pleasant and enjoyable building experience with the Meshify 2. Whether you use this case as a system where you just want to deliver tons of airflow and room for expansion, a workstation with tons of hard drives, a server, or high-end custom liquid cooling, the Meshify 2 will find a way to accommodate your build. For that, along with thermal and acoustic performance that is in-line with what we expect from a mesh front, it earns a rare five-star rating.

The Meshify 2 doesn’t try to reinvent the wheel when it comes to case design, instead gently chiseling away at it to refine the experience. There’s only one thing about it that you need to ask yourself before smashing the buy button: Will you really use the room for storage or cooling parts, or can you buy a smaller case and save yourself some space and money?

Read: Fractal Design Meshify 2 Review

Quick PC Case Shopping Tips

Quick PC Case Shopping Tips

  • Figure out what parts you have/want first. Before prioritizing looks, you’ll want to know what motherboard, graphics card, and cooler you’ll be using, plus how many drives you’ll want to install. This will dictate the size of the cases to consider.
  • Cooling is key, especially in small cases. Airflow is important in choosing the best PC case, especially when it comes to high-end components in tight spaces. Check our cooler reviews for our cooling test results before buying, and remember that cases with glass fronts and tops restrict airflow and may need extra fans.
  • Choose a chassis that you like to look at. Your case of choice is likely to spend lots of time in your peripheral vision. Don’t forget to check airflow and that your parts will fit. But after that, find something that appeals to you visually. Take the time to find a case that appeals to you visually. If you want to show off your case's internals, a case like Hyte's Y60 with its panoramic glass is certainly appealing. But know that generally speaking, the more glass found on a case, particularly in the front, the warmer your system is likely to run.

Discounts on the Best PC Cases

Whether you're buying one of the best PC cases on our list above or a different product, you may find some savings by checking out the latest Corsair coupon codes,  Newegg promo codes or Micro Center coupon codes.

MORE: Best PC Cases

MORE: Best Mini-ITX Cases